Hawkeye Sidekick

Heineken Champions Cup: Munster Rugby 30 – 5 Castres

Murray creativity key
Windswept Thomond Park

Munster Rugby are three points clear in Pool 2 after a three try second half performance over a hard working but limited Castres outfit at Thomond Park. Hawkeye Sidekick was at the Limerick venue and provides his thoughts on proceedings. 

Late scratches force Munster into squad reshuffle

The day started with excitement and optimism for Munster Rugby supporters heading to Thomond Park for this European Cup fixture; a fixture to see the debut of Conor Murray and Joey Carbery half-back partnership as well as Chris Farrell who was in superb form last weekend.

As the fans started to arrive to the hallowed rugby venue, it soon emerged that Carbery would play no part in the contest (hamstring) and after a lengthy consultation with medical staff during team warm ups, Chris Farrell was also forced to sit this fixture out. 

Two key personnel withdrawals for the Irish province but in JJ Hanrahan and Sam Arnold, the side still look loaded with talent and creativity to execute an efficient attacking game plan. Tyler Bleyendaal and Jaco Taute were called into the match day squad and the training drills pregame were executed in a heavy torrential downpour, the visibility reducing with each passing minute.

Tricky weather conditions leads to unforced errors 

The windy conditions were extremely tricky for both sides. The opening exchanges typified with the visitors unable to deal with Murray’s first three box kicks given the cross field breeze at play.

Munster Rugby as well were struggling with the conditions as well as Mike Haley kicked out in the full early doors. The game looked for all intensive purposes to be a pack arm wrestle early doors. 

The pack battle was fascinating in that opening period. Munster Rugby with John Ryan and Dave Kilcoyne prominent in the scrum set piece were winning penalties and setting the attacking foundation for the side. JJ Hanrahan was presented with a regulation three pointer to open the scoring in the first ten minutes of the contest. 

Munster Rugby were looking to create a high tempo game but Castres were resolute in defensive duties and their breakdown work at times stifled the hosts ability to create quick ruck ball.

The line out exchanges ebbed and flowed in the windy conditions. Munster Rugby resorting to the long throw at the back of the line out more than once which did not have the desired effect. The line out was shaky at best for the hosts and with it squandered several opening period opportunities. 

Munster Rugby forcing the play too much

 The second quarter was all Munster Rugby; predominantly camped in the Castres 22 but there was a lack of composure in the attacking lines from the hosts; forcing passes which were not on due to the weather conditions and the back line running lines were at times ponderous and static with minimal supporting runners.

The passage of play whereby Conor Murray realizing that Castres had over committed players to the left hand side switched play but there was a total breakdown in communications with Tadhg Beirne who knocked on. It summed up the host’s lack of precision with ball in hand.

Castres were happy to hit the dressing rooms at half-time only 6-0 down. JJ Hanrahan slotting over another close range penalty after good play from the Munster pack in the second quarter. All Munster Rugby dominance but the pressure built up not yielding the desired points on the board. 

Sharp start to the second half from Munster Rugby 

With management instructions ringing in their ears, Munster Rugby started the second half with renewed tempo and vigor putting pressure on Castres to force a series of scrums just on the Castres 22. Murray to the fore as his line break saw a deft offload to Rory Scannell to crash over. JJ Hanrahan slotting over the extras and the game was out to a thirteen point lead. 

Castres offered a lifeline but fail to take 

Immediately after the concession of the opening try, Castres rumbled into life and were rewarded a penalty which was missed but Murray knocked on in the dead goal area. Castres with a five meter scrum but the resultant ball carries were utterly dismissed by the hosts. Beirne prominent as Castres lost possession on the Munster Rugby 22′. The box kick clearance from Conor Murray marked the end of the contest as Castres again needed to put in the tackle count as Munster Rugby started to probe further. 

Munster Rugby start to create line breaks 

More quality work from Conor Murray setup the second Munster Rugby try of the afternoon; created space inside for CJ Stander to cross over the try line. The score settled Munster Rugby nerves to a certain extent and more good pack pressure resulting in JJ Hanrahan slotting three points to make the score 23-0. The game was over as a contest. The key question was whether Munster Rugby could score an additional two tries in the last fifteen minutes?

The third try arrived with around five minutes left in the contest and it was probably the best move Munster Rugby conjured up in the whole contest. Superb line break and offload from Arnold to Scannell, Scannell to Mathewson who then setup Hanrahan away for the third try. 30-0 as JJ Hanrahan kicked the regulation conversion.

Bonus Point is elusive 

If the Munster Rugby faithful were thinking of a late bonus point try, it was quickly snuffed out as JP Doyle was central to a baffling officiating decision. Andrew Conway was adjudged to have taken a Castres player out before receiving the ball just five meters from the Munster Rugby try line. A dead cert penalty try but Doyle botched the call and gave Castres a penalty instead. A penalty try would have seen Munster Rugby restarting and more than likely securing field position for a possible bonus point try. Oh well! 

Castres’ pack mauled the ball to within ten meters of the line and then decided to launch the ball wide and resulting in a try out in the corner despite the best efforts of JJ Hanrahan. 30-5. Full Time. The bonus point not secured and whether this proves to be a missed opportunity, we won’t know until January 19th. 

Thoughts 

The officiating at times descended into anarchy. Doyle lost control of this fixture in the opening period; no repercussions for Castres at the scrum as Munster Rugby dominated and won a series of scrum penalties. The players decided then to settle old scores and a couple of flash points ensued. The Conway decision summed up a bad day in the office for the officiating crew; it was an easy call. If Conway was getting yellow, then surely it implied preventing a certain try. Penalty try. Castres fans were scratching their heads like the home faithful. 

Munster Rugby adapted to the late personnel scratches but there was a nervousness in their attacking play. There was precious line breaks in the opening period and the line out malfunctioned at a rate of knots. Cleote acting as first receiver had mixed result; ball was potentially a little delayed and did not provide colleagues with the time and space to impress. Cleote and Beirne in breakdown work were on point. 

A reality check for Munster Rugby in their attacking play. Defense was solid if not overly stretched to breaking point such was the limited ball that Castres had in the Munster Rugby 22′. The mission is clear for Munster Rugby; a road trip series against Castres and Gloucester Rugby will determine their European Cup ambitions. Roll on next weekend!